Archive for "August, 1998"

Animal Extremists Continue Road Trip of Vandalism

Aug 28, 1998 No Comments

FCUSA PRESS RELEASE, August 28, 1998
Animal Extremists Continue Road Trip of Vandalism
Animal extremists attempted to raid a fur farm in Eden, Wisconsin on the night of Tuesday, August 25, but fled when they were discovered by the farmer. Two nights later, the same group succeeded in releasing thousands of mink at Brown’s Fur Farm in Beloit, Wisconsin. Sometime during the early morning hours of Thursday, August 27, vandals cut 30 to 40 feet of fencing and released about 3,000 domesticated mink from their cages. On Friday morning, the scenario was repeated at Zumbro River Fur Farm in Rochester, Minnesota where about 2,800 mink were released. The terrorist group Animal Liberation Front (ALF), which works with the Earth Liberation Group (ELF), sent a press release admitting guilt for the releases.
Thanks to the efforts of neighbors in helping recover the animals, most of the domesticated mink were returned to the safety of the farm. However, hundreds were lost to roadkill, stress, dehydration and exhaustion. The damages at each farm will exceed $10,000 which, under the Animal Enterprise Protection Act, escalates these raids to a federal crime. The FBI is investigating.
“Animal extremists have joined up with criminals and are hitting farms, destroying property and causing the deaths of domesticated animals in the most callous manner,” stated Teresa Platt, executive director of Fur Commission USA, which represents over 600 U.S.-based fur farmers.
Fur farmers from Canada and the United States are offering a reward fund of up to $100,000 for information leading to the arrest of these dangerous people. Fur farmers and others involved in resource-based industries have asked governments to investigate the escalation of terrorist incidents under the guise of ‘saving the planet.’ Congress held the first hearings on this issue June 9 in the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee.
In the meantime, animals are still missing and they will be playing havoc with local pets and wildlife, getting run over by cars and dying of stress and starvation, unless they are rounded up and returned to their cages. Anyone seeing a lost mink, please call (619) 575-0139.
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For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

Animal Extremists Continue Road Trip of Vandalism

Aug 28, 1998 No Comments

FUR COMMISSION USA PRESS RELEASE, August 28, 1998
Animal Extremists Continue Road Trip of Vandalism
Animal extremists attempted to raid a fur farm in Eden, Wisconsin on the night of Tuesday, August 25, but fled when they were discovered by the farmer. Two nights later, the same group succeeded in releasing thousands of mink at Brown’s Fur Farm in Beloit, Wisconsin. Sometime during the early morning hours of Thursday, August 27, vandals cut 30 to 40 feet of fencing and released about 3,000 domesticated mink from their cages. On Friday morning, the scenario was repeated at Zumbro River Fur Farm in Rochester, Minnesota where about 2,800 mink were released. The terrorist group Animal Liberation Front (ALF), which works with the Earth Liberation Group (ELF), sent a press release admitting guilt for the releases.
Thanks to the efforts of neighbors in helping recover the animals, most of the domesticated mink were returned to the safety of the farm. However, hundreds were lost to roadkill, stress, dehydration and exhaustion. The damages at each farm will exceed $10,000 which, under the Animal Enterprise Protection Act, escalates these raids to a federal crime. The FBI is investigating.
“Animal extremists have joined up with criminals and are hitting farms, destroying property and causing the deaths of domesticated animals in the most callous manner,” stated Teresa Platt, executive director of Fur Commission USA, which represents over 600 U.S.-based fur farmers.
Fur farmers from Canada and the United States are offering a reward fund of up to $100,000 for information leading to the arrest of these dangerous people. Fur farmers and others involved in resource-based industries have asked governments to investigate the escalation of terrorist incidents under the guise of ‘saving the planet.’ Congress held the first hearings on this issue June 9 in the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee.
In the meantime, animals are still missing and they will be playing havoc with local pets and wildlife, getting run over by cars and dying of stress and starvation, unless they are rounded up and returned to their cages. Anyone seeing a lost mink, please call (619) 575-0139.
-
For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

FBI to Investigate Wisconsin Animal Release

Aug 27, 1998 No Comments

FCUSA PRESS RELEASE, August 27, 1998
FBI to Investigate Wisconsin Animal Release
Sometime during the early morning hours of Thursday, August 27, vandals cut 30 to 40 feet of fencing and released about 3,000 domesticated mink from their cages at Brown’s Mink Farm in Beloit, Wisconsin. Neighbors have been arriving all morning to help with the mink round-up.
This crime against fur farms is the fourth in the last week. Vandals hit a farm in Minnesota and two in Iowa last week, damaging property and releasing animals. Again, thanks to the efforts of neighbors the loss of animal life was kept to a minimum.
The damages on the Brown farm will be over $10,000 and under the Animal Enterprise Protection Act, escalate this raid to a federal crime. The FBI has been called in to investigate.
“Animal extremists have joined up with criminals and are hitting farms, destroying property and causing the deaths of domesticated animals in the most callous manner,” stated Teresa Platt, executive director of Fur Commission USA, which represents over 600 U.S.-based fur farmers.
Fur farmers from Canada and the United States are offering a reward fund of up to $100,000 for information leading to the arrest of these dangerous people. Fur farmers and others involved in resource-based industry have asked governments to investigate the escalation of terrorists incidents under the guise of ‘saving the planet’, or eco-terrorism.” Congress held the first hearings on this issue June 9 in the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee.
In the meantime, animals are still missing and they will be playing havoc with local pets and wildlife, getting run over by cars and dying of stress and starvation, unless they are rounded up and returned to their cages. Anyone seeing a lost mink, please call (619) 575-0139.
-
For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

FBI to Investigate Wisconsin Animal Release

Aug 27, 1998 No Comments

FUR COMMISSION USA PRESS RELEASE, August 27, 1998
FBI to Investigate Wisconsin Animal Release
Sometime during the early morning hours of Thursday, August 27, vandals cut 30 to 40 feet of fencing and released about 3,000 domesticated mink from their cages at Brown’s Mink Farm in Beloit, Wisconsin. Neighbors have been arriving all morning to help with the mink round-up.
This crime against fur farms is the fourth in the last week. Vandals hit a farm in Minnesota and two in Iowa last week, damaging property and releasing animals. Again, thanks to the efforts of neighbors the loss of animal life was kept to a minimum.
The damages on the Brown farm will be over $10,000 and under the Animal Enterprise Protection Act, escalate this raid to a federal crime. The FBI has been called in to investigate.
“Animal extremists have joined up with criminals and are hitting farms, destroying property and causing the deaths of domesticated animals in the most callous manner,” stated Teresa Platt, executive director of Fur Commission USA, which represents over 600 U.S.-based fur farmers.
Fur farmers from Canada and the United States are offering a reward fund of up to $100,000 for information leading to the arrest of these dangerous people. Fur farmers and others involved in resource-based industry have asked governments to investigate the escalation of terrorists incidents under the guise of ‘saving the planet’, or eco-terrorism.” Congress held the first hearings on this issue June 9 in the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee.
In the meantime, animals are still missing and they will be playing havoc with local pets and wildlife, getting run over by cars and dying of stress and starvation, unless they are rounded up and returned to their cages. Anyone seeing a lost mink, please call (619) 575-0139.
-
For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

Missouri Seeks to Regularize Otter-Trapping

Aug 26, 1998 No Comments

August 26, 1998
Missouri Seeks to Regularize Otter-Trapping
Missouri is on the verge of reinstating an annual trapping season for river otters following complaints from anglers that they are destroying local fish stocks.
The problem has arisen following a Missouri Department of Conservation program launched in 1982 to save the otters from extinction, reports the Associated Press (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Aug. 2). The program surpassed all expectations, and with the population now estimated at 8-10,000, anglers view the otters as a pest and claim they have “devastated” fish stocks in rivers and ponds.
The solution, say the anglers, is to reinstate a permanent annual trapping season, and according to AP the Department “has taken their concerns to heart.” Trapping recommenced in 1996, but the season has so far only been approved on a year-to-year basis. In the 1997-98 season, trappers took 1,146 otters.
According to Dave Hamilton, a biologist with the Department, no one thought the otter population would grow so fast, or that they would spread to habitats other than those in which they were previously found. “We thought they would be river- and stream-oriented,” he told AP. “They’re using reservoirs, ponds and wetlands,” he said. Sightings have even been reported in cities.
Now Hamilton has reported to the Department that otter numbers can support a regular trapping season, and the Department in turn has asked the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for authority to export the pelts. Otter pelts are worth about $40, with the main export markets being China, South Korea and Europe, where they are used for clothing and accessories.
“Right now, we’re asking for multi-year authorization so we don’t have to do this every year,” Hamilton said.
Animal rights groups, such as the Animal Legal Defense Fund, are now expected to file lawsuits to block authorization by Fish and Wildlife.
Fund spokeswoman Jeanne McVey told AP that she did not believe the otters were ruining fish stocks or that trapping would reduce their numbers. “That whole fish-otter argument is merely an excuse,” she said. “It’s an excuse used to justify the trapping of a very valuable fur-bearer.”
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For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

Missouri Seeks to Regularize Otter-Trapping

Aug 26, 1998 No Comments

August 26, 1998
Missouri Seeks to Regularize Otter-Trapping
Missouri is on the verge of reinstating an annual trapping season for river otters following complaints from anglers that they are destroying local fish stocks.
The problem has arisen following a Missouri Department of Conservation program launched in 1982 to save the otters from extinction, reports the Associated Press (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Aug. 2). The program surpassed all expectations, and with the population now estimated at 8-10,000, anglers view the otters as a pest and claim they have “devastated” fish stocks in rivers and ponds.
The solution, say the anglers, is to reinstate a permanent annual trapping season, and according to AP the Department “has taken their concerns to heart.” Trapping recommenced in 1996, but the season has so far only been approved on a year-to-year basis. In the 1997-98 season, trappers took 1,146 otters.
According to Dave Hamilton, a biologist with the Department, no one thought the otter population would grow so fast, or that they would spread to habitats other than those in which they were previously found. “We thought they would be river- and stream-oriented,” he told AP. “They’re using reservoirs, ponds and wetlands,” he said. Sightings have even been reported in cities.
Now Hamilton has reported to the Department that otter numbers can support a regular trapping season, and the Department in turn has asked the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for authority to export the pelts. Otter pelts are worth about $40, with the main export markets being China, South Korea and Europe, where they are used for clothing and accessories.
“Right now, we’re asking for multi-year authorization so we don’t have to do this every year,” Hamilton said.
Animal rights groups, such as the Animal Legal Defense Fund, are now expected to file lawsuits to block authorization by Fish and Wildlife.
Fund spokeswoman Jeanne McVey told AP that she did not believe the otters were ruining fish stocks or that trapping would reduce their numbers. “That whole fish-otter argument is merely an excuse,” she said. “It’s an excuse used to justify the trapping of a very valuable fur-bearer.”
-
For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

Vandals Strike in Iowa

Aug 24, 1998 No Comments

FCUSA PRESS RELEASE, August 24, 1998
Vandals Strike in Iowa
Farmers Offer $100,000 Reward
Sometime during the early morning hours of Friday, August 20, vandals opened the doors of about 700 mink cages at Isebrands Fur Farm in Jewell, Iowa. Since the animals were still sharing cages with their littermates, about 2,500 mink were released. Neighbors came from miles around to help recover the animals.
As of August 24, about 500 mink were still missing and as the day loomed hot, Mark Isebrands, who owns the farm with his family, fretted over the health of the animals. “They will soon be dying of the heat without care,” he stated. “Obviously whoever was involved in this crime didn’t care about the animals and was simply trying to make some sort of political statement at the animals’ expense.” Isebrands raises mink for their pelts for sale to the international fur garment trade.
“This is the third farm hit in three days. This may seem like a road trip with a nasty focus,” stated Teresa Platt, executive director of Fur Commission USA, which represents over 600 U.S.-based fur farmers, “but many of these vandals spout anti-capitalist rhetoric and enjoy destroying property and livelihoods. Fur farmers from Canada and the United States are offering a reward fund of up to $100,000 for information leading to the arrest of these dangerous people. We also ask governments to investigate the escalation of terrorist incidents under the guise of ‘saving the planet’, or eco-terrorism.”
In the meantime, 500 animals are still missing and they will be playing havoc with local pets and wildlife until they are rounded up and returned to their cages. Anyone seeing a lost mink, please call (619) 575-0139.
-
For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

Vandals Strike in Iowa

Aug 24, 1998 No Comments

FUR COMMISSION USA PRESS RELEASE, August 24, 1998
Vandals Strike in Iowa
Farmers Offer $100,000 Reward
Sometime during the early morning hours of Friday, August 20, vandals opened the doors of about 700 mink cages at Isebrands Fur Farm in Jewell, Iowa. Since the animals were still sharing cages with their littermates, about 2,500 mink were released. Neighbors came from miles around to help recover the animals.
As of August 24, about 500 mink were still missing and as the day loomed hot, Mark Isebrands, who owns the farm with his family, fretted over the health of the animals. “They will soon be dying of the heat without care,” he stated. “Obviously whoever was involved in this crime didn’t care about the animals and was simply trying to make some sort of political statement at the animals’ expense.” Isebrands raises mink for their pelts for sale to the international fur garment trade.
“This is the third farm hit in three days. This may seem like a road trip with a nasty focus,” stated Teresa Platt, executive director of Fur Commission USA, which represents over 600 U.S.-based fur farmers, “but many of these vandals spout anti-capitalist rhetoric and enjoy destroying property and livelihoods. Fur farmers from Canada and the United States are offering a reward fund of up to $100,000 for information leading to the arrest of these dangerous people. We also ask governments to investigate the escalation of terrorist incidents under the guise of ‘saving the planet’, or eco-terrorism.”
In the meantime, 500 animals are still missing and they will be playing havoc with local pets and wildlife until they are rounded up and returned to their cages. Anyone seeing a lost mink, please call (619) 575-0139.
-
For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

Eco-Terrorists Hit Iowa Fox Farm

Aug 21, 1998 No Comments

FCUSA PRESS RELEASE, August 21, 1998
Eco-Terrorists Hit Iowa Fox Farm
Most Animals Returned Home Safely
Sometime after a feeding at 10 p.m. the night before and 5:45 a.m. August 20, eco-terrorists invaded Hidden Valley Fox Farm in Guttenberg, Iowa, opening doors to the cages of about 350 domestically raised foxes.
Although many of the foxes never left their cages, the Hansel family called on their neighbors to help capture animals and set live traps in an effort to return the animals to the safety of the farm. As of the morning of August 21, about 60 animals were still missing.
The Hansel family has been raising fox for over 20 years. Steve Hansel, who owns the farm with his wife, stated, “So far we haven’t lost any animals to road traffic, stress or starvation and we have the quick response of our neighbors to thank for that.”
Although animal “liberationists” who admit guilt for such crimes as this assume that the animals will “have had a taste of freedom” or live in a “natural way,” they are wrong.
“Natural” – that is, what is normal – for domestically raised animals is life on a farm, a life of food delivered, no predators, mating, birthing, weaning, living and dying under the care of humans. “Unnatural” for a domestically raised fox is being driven into the wild, forced to search for food in foreign terrain, ripped to pieces by dogs and run over by cars.
“We condemn the use of violence, intimidation and terrorist activities by anyone in the advancement of a cause or political goal,” stated Teresa Platt, executive director of Fur Commission USA, which represents over 600 U.S.-based fur farmers. “These aggressive and illegal tactics are being used too often in the debate over how best to feed, clothe and shelter the world. Fur farmers are joining other resource providers in asking Congress to hold hearings on these illegal activities.”
Anyone seeing a lost fox, please call (619) 575-0139.
-
For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA

Eco-Terrorists Hit Iowa Fox Farm

Aug 21, 1998 No Comments

FUR COMMISSION USA PRESS RELEASE, August 21, 1998
Eco-Terrorists Hit Iowa Fox Farm
Most Animals Returned Home Safely
Sometime after a feeding at 10 p.m. the night before and 5:45 a.m. August 20, eco-terrorists invaded Hidden Valley Fox Farm in Guttenberg, Iowa, opening doors to the cages of about 350 domestically raised foxes.
Although many of the foxes never left their cages, the Hansel family called on their neighbors to help capture animals and set live traps in an effort to return the animals to the safety of the farm. As of the morning of August 21, about 60 animals were still missing.
The Hansel family has been raising fox for over 20 years. Steve Hansel, who owns the farm with his wife, stated, “So far we haven’t lost any animals to road traffic, stress or starvation and we have the quick response of our neighbors to thank for that.”
Although animal “liberationists” who admit guilt for such crimes as this assume that the animals will “have had a taste of freedom” or live in a “natural way,” they are wrong.
“Natural” – that is, what is normal – for domestically raised animals is life on a farm, a life of food delivered, no predators, mating, birthing, weaning, living and dying under the care of humans. “Unnatural” for a domestically raised fox is being driven into the wild, forced to search for food in foreign terrain, ripped to pieces by dogs and run over by cars.
“We condemn the use of violence, intimidation and terrorist activities by anyone in the advancement of a cause or political goal,” stated Teresa Platt, executive director of Fur Commission USA, which represents over 600 U.S.-based fur farmers. “These aggressive and illegal tactics are being used too often in the debate over how best to feed, clothe and shelter the world. Fur farmers are joining other resource providers in asking Congress to hold hearings on these illegal activities.”
Anyone seeing a lost fox, please call (619) 575-0139.
-
For further information contact Fur Commission USA.
Home
© 1998-2011 Fur Commission USA